September 23rd, 2014

Oct2014front October 2014Oct2014front

  By Matt Guyette


Cheshire County assistance programs.

Financial assistance from your town

The various towns and cities in Cheshire County New Hampshire offer assistance to those who qualify. Individuals and families may get help with paying rent, utilities, heating expenses, free food and certain prescription medications. In addition, the towns are a great place to stop by to get referrals to local charities and non-profits, and to gain access to various government assistance programs. All towns are required to provide these resources to residents per New Hampshire state laws. Keene New Hampshire (603) 357-9809. Roxbury and Surry also offer aid. Phone (603) 352-3075

Cheshire Community Action Agency – Southwestern Community Services, Inc.

Electric Bill Assistance Program - This option provides qualifying PSNH customers with a discount on their monthly electric and utility bills.

Fuel Assistance Program - This is a resource that provides financial assistance for paying heating bills and utility expenses to handicapped, elderly, and low-income residents.

Rent help and eviction prevention - This particular assistance program offers eviction prevention services, including landlord/tenant mediation, budget counseling, one-time financial supports, and referrals to other resources and non-profits.

Neighbor Helping Neighbor Program - This is an energy assistance program that provides funds and emergency help for paying utility bills as well as energy assistance (electric or natural gas) to needy families and individuals who are experiencing some type of financial hardships, if the family has a disconnection pending, and if the family is ineligible for help from the Fuel Assistance Program.

Food Pantry - Can help people provide food for their family.

Senior Energy Assistance Program, which is known as SEAS, provides emergency energy bill assistance, grants, and funds in an amount of up to $270 per elderly household for individuals and families.

Call the Keene NH based Southwestern Community Services, Inc. at (603) 352-7512. While the above list touches upon many of their programs, other resources are available as well. Read more Southwestern Community Services (SCS) programs.

Consumer Credit Counseling is a non-profit that helps people through difficult times. Services offered include budget counseling, foreclosure prevention, and debt management programs. Call the Keene New Hampshire agency at (800) 327-6778. Find other debt help programs.

Emergency help for food, information, and paying bills

The Keene Salvation Army may be able to help people facing a crisis. The phone number is (603) 352-0607. Among the programs and services offered include a food pantry, Christmas, Thanksgiving, and holiday meals and gifts, and they rarely may have funds for paying bills, or can direct people to agencies that can help with bills, rent, and more. For example, find programs that offer rent help.

How to Winterize Your New England Home

This time of year, many of us are busy decorating and planning for the holidays. In doing so, we often overlook preparing our homes for the cold weather. Getting your home ready for the winter season can make a drastic difference in your utility bill. To help, here are some tips for winterizing your New England home from The Boston Globe which we recommend.

The first very simple step you can take is to make sure all of your windows are securely locked. Of course, locked windows are important to ensure the safety of your home, but they also help to prevent any drafts. Many homeowners do not realize that unlocked windows usually leave a 2 millimeter opening at the top, which is plenty of space for cold air to whisk in.

Just as windows may allow a lot of cold air in, your doors are probably doing the same. If your door jiggles or you feel a draft walking by entrance ways, you may want to invest in a door sweep. Door sweeps are long metal or rubber extensions attached to the door to close the gap between the edge of the door and the flooring. A quick way to test your doors is to close a dollar bill in them and try to pull it out. If it slips out with ease, you know you are losing money through that door. Invest in stick-on rubber weather stripping if that is the case.

Lastly, everyone loves to have their fireplace blazing as much as possible in the wintertime, but did you know that it could be costing you a lot more money than you ever thought? Be sure to close the flue in your fireplace when it is not in use. Many people just do not even think of it, and keep it open year round. Doing this leaves a huge tunnel open for outside air to flow into your home.

We wish you a warm and cozy winter at your New England home. For more inspiration, tips and ideas on home design in greater Boston, be sure to like David Sharff Architect on Facebook!

 

Halloween Safety Tips for Grown-ups

Parents of trick-or-treating kids can get so caught up in the fun themselves that they might forget some simple safety ideas that could keep everyone out of trouble. Having a fun and safe Halloween will make it all worth-while!

Kids love Halloween! They get to dress up and get free candy! What a perfect holiday! Give your kids some precious Halloween memories that they’ll have for life.

If you take your kids to a sponsored event, like a safe Halloween thrown by your church or community center, make sure to keep an eye on them at all times. Even though it seems less dangerous, you are still in a strange environment full of people that you don’t know. All it takes is a minute with your back turned to find your child gone.

Cell phones are everywhere now! Everyone seems to have one, they can be so affordable. Make sure that your child has a pre-programmed cell phone with him/her if they go out on Halloween night! Make sure that all important numbers are already there and ready for use. Oct2014back


July 20th, 2014

Aug2014frontAugust 2014 Aug2014front

By Matt Guyette

 



 

Monadnock Food Co-op

Keene, NH

The Monadnock Food Co-op provides a diverse selection of local, organic, and natural foods in the heart of downtown Keene. We offer bulk foods, meat, produce, frozen food, dairy, and beer & wine departments, as well as a deli with a prepared foods and grab-and-go section.  Come visit the co-op today!

34 Cypress St.

Keene, NH 03431

Phone: (603) 355-8008

Email: marketing@monadnockfood.coop

www.monadnockfood.coop

Hours

Mon-Sat 7am-9pm

Sun 9am-9pm


Investing in the community - that’s what the Monadnock United Way is all about. The United Way adds value to the community beyond the independent efforts of local human service agencies. By promoting partnerships and seeking preventative solutions, Monadnock United Way works to empower individuals and build communities.


MDS SERVICES

MDS services and supports are provided by:

Children’s Service Coordination (CSC) – works with families to determine the best combination of supports for children up to age 21. Includes Early Supports and Services (ESS), Partners in Health, In-Home Supports, and information and referral.

Adult Service Coordination (ASC) – works with individuals over age 21 to identify and develop the support they need to live in their community.

Specialty Services – provides Intake, Respite, Transportation, Nursing, and the Personal Care Services Program.

MDS Individual Services Option (ISO) – provides direct support to people so they can live in their home, go to work, and participate as valued community members.

LifeArt – a community resource center in downtown Keene for meetings and activities open to people of all abilities.

Monadnock Center for Successful Transitions (MCST) – offers transition resources to students and adults with a wide variety of disabilities.

Provider Agencies – work directly with individuals served by MDS to provide residential, employment and other supports.

MDS – Keene 121 Railroad Street • 603-352-1304


Hiking & Biking Trails in the Monadnock Region

Much of the Monadnock Region is covered by woods, some of which have trails maintained for the pleasure of walkers and hikers. The city of Keene maintains a paved walking and bicycling path which runs from East to West Keene, and further unpaved paths branching out to the south through Swanzey, and northwest through Westmoreland.

These pathways follow the railway bed of the tracks which used to run between Keene and Boston. These are multi-use paths which are under development for road bikes, but are currently perfect for mountain biking, hikers or off-road walkers, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing, snow machines and horses.

Snow machines are allowed to use the railbed trail from December 15 until the snow cover becomes spotty in the spring. Motorized dirt bikes, All Terrain Vehicles and other motorized vehicles are not allowed usage of the trail at any time.

Mount Monadnock, with trails off Route 124 in Jaffrey, is a symbol of the Monadnock Region. 3,165 feet high, it is one of the most climbed mountains in the world. The NH department of Parks and Recreation offers a map of routes up the mountain, locations of campgrounds, and other information found at www.nhstateparks.org


What are the Benefits of Kayaking

Few exercises provide the entertainment range of kayaking. One minute, you’re gliding through the water as you admire the tranquility of your surroundings — the next minute, you’re zipping down a set of rapids. But kayaking isn’t just a way to create variation in your workout. This water sport has a number of benefits that can greatly improve your overall health.

Strength — Inside and Out – The website Better Health Channel notes that kayaking can elevate your cardiovascular health and strengthen a number of major muscle groups throughout your body. While kayaking provides a challenging upper-body workout, it’s also suitable for your lower body. It’s possible to navigate the boat through leg movements, which keeps your entire body active during the activity.

Overall Health Improvement – Kayaking provides an aerobic workout, which should be a key part of your weekly fitness routine. General benefits of all forms of aerobic exercise include increased endurance, improved heart health, better regulation of cholesterol levels, blood sugar control, lower blood pressure and better lung strength, according to the Cleveland Clinic.Aug2014back

May 20th, 2014

   June 2014

  By Matt Guyette

 

 

 


 

Why is it so important to stay hydrated?

Your body depends on water for survival. Did you know that water makes up more than half of your body weight? Every cell, tissue and organ in your body needs water to function correctly. For example, your body uses water to maintain its temperature, remove waste and lubricate joints. Water is essential for good health.

Tips for staying hydrated

    • Keep a bottle of water with you during the day. Consider carrying a reusable water bottle and filling it from the tap rather than purchasing bottled water, which is expensive and creates plastic bottle waste.
    • If plain water doesn’t interest you, try adding a slice of lemon to your drink.
    • If you’re going to be exercising, make sure you drink water before, during and after your workout.
    • Start and end your day with a glass of water.
    • When you’re feeling hungry, drink water. The sensation of thirst is often confused with hunger. True hunger will not be satisfied by drinking water. Drinking water may also contribute to a healthy weight loss plan, as some research suggests drinking water will help you feel full.
    • Drink on a schedule if you have trouble remembering to drink water. For example, drink water when you wake up; at breakfast, lunch and dinner; and when you go to bed. Or drink a small glass of water at the top of each hour.
    • Drink water when you go to a restaurant. Not only does it keep you hydrated, but it’s free!

 

The Electric Assistance Program provides income-eligible households with a discount off their electric bill each month for a 12-month period (24-month period for our elderly households on fixed income). The discount is applied to the bill so the amount due is the actual amount due (discount already figured in). The discounts range from 8% to 77% depending on income, household size, etc. 

Neighbor Helping Neighbor is a program designed for folks who have not qualified for Fuel Assistance in the past 12 months (and have not already received Neighbor Helping Neighbor in the past 24 months). This program does not have income guidelines but is for households that have faced a hardship and now have a disconnect notice. It can pay up to $200 to prevent a disconnection (or up to $300 if the household also heats with electric).

 

Anyone interested in either of the above programs can call Southwestern Community Services (SCS) and ask for Energy Services. (It’s not usually a good idea to have them call me (Beth Daniels) directly because I am overseeing three departments which equals 15 of those kinds of individual programs – my staff will tend to their needs much quicker if they are just put through to one of them). The phone number is 352-7512.

 

Sunburn results when the amount of exposure to the sun or other ultraviolet light source exceeds the ability of the melanin to protect the skin. Melanin is the skin’s protective coloring (pigment). Sunburn in a very light-skinned person may occur in less than 15 minutes of midday sun exposure, while a dark-skinned person may tolerate the same exposure for hours.

 

Keep in mind:

  • There is no such thing as a “healthy tan.” Unprotected sun exposure causes early aging of the skin.
  • Sun exposure can cause first and second degree burns.
  • Skin cancer usually appears in adulthood. But it is caused by sun exposure and sunburns that began as early as childhood. You can help prevent skin cancer by protecting your skin and your children’s skin from the harmful rays of the sun.

 

Factors that make sunburn more likely:

  • Infants and children are very sensitive to the burning effects of the sun.
  • People with fair skin are more likely to get sunburn. But even dark and black skin can burn and should be protected.
  • The sun’s rays are strongest during the hours of 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The sun’s rays are also stronger at higher altitudes and lower latitudes (closer to the tropics). Reflection off water, sand, or snow can make the sun’s burning rays stronger.
  • Sun lamps can cause severe sunburn.
  • Some medications (such as the antibiotic doxycycline) can make your skin easier to sunburn.
  • Some medical conditions (such as lupus) can make you more sensitive to the sun.

 

If you do get a sunburn:

  • Take a cool shower or bath or place clean wet, cool wash rags on the burn.
  • Do not use products that contain benzocaine or lidocaine. These can cause allergy in some persons and make the burn worse.
  • If there are blisters, dry bandages may help prevent infection.
  • If your skin is not blistering, moisturizing cream may be applied to relieve discomfort. Do not use butter, petroleum jelly (Vaseline), or other oil-based products. These can block pores and so that heat and sweat cannot escape, which can lead to infection.
  • Over-the-counter medicines, such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen, help to relieve pain from sunburn. Do not give aspirin to children.
  • Cortisone creams may help reduce the inflammation.
  • Loose cotton clothing should be worn.

 

There is a reason the aloe vera plant has been around since the prehistoric times. The gel that oozes out of this cactus contains active compounds which fight pain, infection, inflammation, and can prevent the dreaded post-burn peeling.

March 23rd, 2014

April 2014

By Matt Guyette

 

 


Tips for Coping with Spring Allergies

Tree pollen is the major source of itchy eyes and runny noses that affect many people in springtime. Pollen is spread by wind currents which makes it difficult to avoid for the one in five Americans who has a pollen allergy.  Here are some suggestions:

  • Stay inside and avoid exercising as much as possible, particularly during the early morning hours when pollen levels are highest.
  • Avoid yard work such as mowing or raking.
  • Keep windows closed in your home and car. Avoid using window fans that draw in outside air. Use air conditioning and change filters frequently.
  • Shower and wash your hair often to remove pollens. Wash children’s hair before they go to bed if they have been playing outdoors.
  • Wash pillowcases often. Dry clothes indoors.
  • Keep pets that have been outdoors out of bedrooms.
  • Talk to your doctor about new medications that are available to control allergic inflammation and provide non-sedating symptom relief.
  • Check pollen levels in your local area through newspapers, local media websites or at www.pollen.com

 

Pollen from various grasses is airborne during the summer and weeds such as ragweed proliferate in the fall.  Keep these tips in mind throughout the coming months.
Many people are also affected by indoor allergy triggers such as dust mites, pet dander, mold, secondhand smoke or other irritants including perfumed products.
Even common or mild allergies can trigger asthma episodes so it is important to know what you are allergic to, avoid those things as much as possible and follow your healthcare practitioner’s instructions about using preventive medications to control the inflammation in your airways that can lead to asthma flare-ups. For a free copy of “Tips to Control Indoor Asthma and Allergy Triggers,” contact the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, New England Chapter, at 1-877-2-ASTHMA or by e-mail at aafane@aafane.org.

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America; New England Chapter offers educational programs throughout the region, publishes a newsletter and other materials and runs a telephone resource and information line to help people live well with asthma and allergies including food allergies. For more information call 1-877-2-ASTHMA or visit www.asthmaandallergies.org.

Source: Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America, New England Chapter.

 

Chicken soup: Medical experts considered this as a mere hoax until a year ago when a research showed surprising benefits to the recovery rate of subjects experiencing the common cold. Since spring allergy triggers nasal fluid build-up, it is a smart idea to have chicken soup not only on a rainy day but during springtime as well.

Adult Services

Adult Service Coordination (ASC) provides assistance to individuals over the age of 21 with intellectual disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, cerebral palsy and other developmental disabilities. Services are also available to adults with disorders such as traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease and other degenerative brain disorders.
The Adult Service Coordination team at MDS assists adults with developmental and related disabilities as they identify personal goals, and then secures the supports and resources required to achieve them. Adult services are tailored to the needs of the individuals receiving supports and those closest to them that share in the vision. We help individuals, their families, guardians, friends and staff develop and maintain the system of supports and services that enable individuals to live in their communities, work, develop meaningful relationships, and enjoy life to the fullest.

Adult Service Coordinators work with individuals and their families to:

  • Create an environment that empowers individuals to speak out for themselves and receive the highest quality services available;
  • Search for opportunities, connections and ways to make the seemingly impossible probable;
  • Offer information, explore options and network with others;
  • Increase community awareness of the talents and gifts those with disabilities can offer.

 

MDS/ISO

The Adult Individual Services Option at Monadnock Developmental Services (MDS-ISO) helps adults with disabilities to access supports and services based on an individual’s life plan. Our goal is to create rich learning environments for both staff and individuals receiving services by building on the relationship between learning and self-determination. This includes positive behavior change through Gentle Teaching — a process that recognizes the vital role of bonding and friendship in healthy human growth and development. Our services support each individual’s efforts to achieve autonomy and empowerment through self-determination.

For information, contact your service coordinator or Darlene Nash This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it at 603-352-1304 or 800-469-6082.

 

 

 


January 25th, 2014

 

 February 2014
By Matt Guyette

 

 


PEDESTRIAN SAFETY

Ice and snow-covered roads and walkways can be serious safety hazards.
• Walk on sidewalks, if possible. If they are icy and you must take to the streets, walk against the flow of traffic and as close to the curb as you can.
• Wear a bright piece of outer clothing if you have to walk in the street or road. Dark winter colors are often hard for motorists to see.
• Don’t wear a hat or scarf that blocks your vision or makes it hard for you to hear traffic.
• Ice and snow can alter road conditions making it hard for vehicles to stop or slow down. Before you step off the curb — even at a stop sign or traffic light — make sure approaching vehicles have come to a complete stop.
• Be aware that snowdrifts can turn familiar territory into an alien landscape, covering curbs and other potential hazards.
• Bending your knees a little and taking slower, shorter steps can greatly reduce your chances of falling.


Winter Skin Care

Winter, with its cold air and drying heat, can be tough on your skin. And no matter where you live, there are certain basic skin-care things you need to do:
• Moisturize often.
• Take shorter, warm (not hot) showers and baths.
• Keep the humidity level up indoors.
But winter in chilly New England is different than winter in California or the Pacific Northwest. Dermatologists from seven U.S. regions share their best skin-care tips so you can baby your skin in whatever state you find yourself settled in for the winter.
Dermatologist Robert Greenberg, MD, says wintry temperatures on the East Coast can mean the humidity dips indoors when the heat is turned on and stays on. “The air is very dry and we lose water from our skin to the dry air,” he says. Some people use wood stoves for heat, and that dries the indoor air even more.
Greenberg says he’s had to dissuade his patients from shaking off the chill with a hot shower when they scramble from bed. “A long, hot shower in the morning is not a good idea,” he says. It’s too drying.
Greenberg tells residents to avoid harsh soaps, use gentle moisturizers, and mild laundry soaps to prevent skin irritation, especially when it gets drier as the winter goes on. He also says to humidify the indoor air as much as possible.


New Hope New Horizons (NHNH)
provides life enriching services to adults of all abilities so that they may achieve their personal hopes and dreams. These services include employment, day and community outreach, and residential support. A dedicated staff composed of both new and long-term members is committed to the success of the people they support.
Employment Services
New Hope New Horizons assists people who have a developmental or acquired disability in securing quality jobs and provides them with the least intrusive long-term supports necessary to maintain those jobs and to expand career opportunities. NHNH supports both the employee and the employer to assure a successful job match.
Day and Community Outreach
For adults who have a developmental or acquired disability, NHNH provides support in developing and maintaining an active life in their community. By providing a flexible system of supports, each person has opportunities to choose and participate in a variety of activities that promote personal growth and assist in developing and maintaining real, long-lasting relationships. Exciting and fun-filled days may include the following activities: dance and movement therapy, crafts, cooking, sign language, and educational and recreational experiences.
Residential Support Services
NHNH provides support to people who have a developmental or acquired disability so they can live fulfilling lives in their communities. In addition to providing care and support, NHNH assists each individual in accessing a home and living situation which meets his/her need for independence.

Support is also provided to families who have an adult child with a disability, assisting them in taking an active role in the design of their adult child’s services, so he or she may continue to live in the family home.
NEW HOPE NEW HORIZONS
69 Island St Ste Z
Keene, NH,03431
603 352 3610

December 1st, 2013

 December 2013

By Matt Guyette

 

 

 


The Keene Salvation Army is located at 15 Roxbury Plaza

Hours of Operation:

Monday through Friday

9:00am to 4:00pm

Social Service Hours

Monday through Thursday

10:00am to 3:00pm

Children’s Sunday School

Sundays at 9:45am

Worship Service

Sundays at 11:00am

If you need help with general assistance or during the holidays,
would like to volunteer, make a financial contribution or donate
goods, please contact us:#

- Phone: (603)352-0607

- Fax: (603)352-0623

- Email:.
Larry.Setty@use.salvationarmy.org

Doris.Setty@use.salvationarmy.org

Weekly Activities

  • Sunbeams
  • Boy’s Adventure
  • Girl Guards
  • Jr. Soldiers
  • Bible Bowl
  • Women’s Ministry
  • Men’s Fellowship
  • Youth Music & Arts

Additional Services

  • Community Care Teams
  • Pastoral Counseling

 


Clothing banks and thrift stores are available in most communities.
They may sell gently used clothes or toys to the general public which
can then be used as Christmas presents by those families. Some of
the centers may even provide vouchers or gift certificates to qualified
low income families. Those can then be used to shop for free items
during the holiday at the clothing closet. While the demand is greatest
during the Christmas holiday season, the Salvation Army operates
year round and also has other options available to low income
families for their Easter and Thanksgiving needs. Some services and
resources are offered directly by the agency, such as Angel Tree, and
others are run in partnership with local churches and charities, in
particular Thanksgiving meals. Food baskets are even provided
around Easter too.

Hundred Nights

Cold Weather Shelter & Drop-in Resource Center

17 Lamson Street, Keene, NH 03431

Phone: (603) 352-5197

www.hundrednights.org

Cold weather emergency shelter open Dec. 21 – March 31;
resource center open year-round.


Hard to believe, but this program has been offered for almost 2 years
now. Our Guest Chef prepares a lightlunch every Sunday along
with the help of an excellent group of energetic volunteers.
This freshly prepared meal is offered each Sunday from 12:00–1:30PM
These meals are created in a large part with donated products and the
vision of our Guest Chefs. Please give us a call at (603) 352-3200
if you would like more information or to find out how you can
participate in this or our evening Hot Meal program.

This is an excellent chance for you to learn more about
The Community Kitchen in a more relaxed weekend atmosphere.
Families, businesses and organizations are welcome to reserve
a specific Sunday to prepare a light lunch, then serve and clean-up
after the meal. Children ages 14 and over are welcome to volunteer.

Please call for more
information at (603) 352-3200.

Hot Meal Program —
Weeknights

Dinner is served weeknights from 5:00—6:30 pm.
We do our best to offer well-balanced nutritional meals:
main dish (meal, poultry or fish), vegetarian dish, starch,
choice of two vegetables, garden and fruit salads, assorted sides,
desserts and beverages. Anyone who is in need of a prepared meal or
companionship is welcome.

ALL ARE WELCOME!


Christmas assistance programs.

Millions of families are struggling, and the holidays, including
Christmas, make those struggles more apparent. However these
individuals do have some options and resources available to them.
The various Christmas Assistance Programs that are offered by
the Salvation Army provide holidays meals, toys and other
assistance for a struggling family’s children and also the seniors
that may reside in the household. In addition, the family may be
able to receive the necessary food and grocery items that are
needed to make a Christmas dinner for their family. The Salvation
Army’s Christmas Assistance Program is the non-profit charity
organization’s largest outreach event that is held each and every year.
Families and individuals may register for holiday assistance by
completing the application process, which usually starts during
October or November at their local Salvation Army center.

September 26th, 2013

 

 October 2013

  By  Matt Guyette

 

 



Weekly cribbage meeting at Chesco every Thursday, 1PM.
Every third Thursday is the cribbage tournament,
play
 to win a trophy.
Come join us even if you don’t know how to play,
will teach you the game.


Food Resources

The Community Kitchen
352-3200

37 Mechanic St.
Keene, NH  03431

http://thecommunitykitchen.org

Hot Meals
Monday – Friday   5:00 – 6:30 pm
Sunday  12:00 -1:30 pm

Food Boxes
Wednesday     12:30 – 5:30 pm
Thursday         11:30 – 4:30 pm

 

St. Vincent de Paul Society
352-3525

St. Bernard’s Catholic Church, side door
173 Main St.  Keene, NH  03431
Monday, Wednesday, Friday  7:00 – 8:00 pm

 

Food Stamps

NH Dept. of Health & Human Services – 357-3510 or 1-800-624-9700
809 Court St.  Keene, NH  03431
Assists families in applying for food stamps if they are eligible

 

Granite State Monarchs
352-5093 or 1-866-352-5093

64 Beaver St.  Keene, NH  03431
Lunch available every Thursday at 11:00 am.
Please call with questions.

 

Salvation Army
352-0607

15 Roxbury Plaza  Keene, NH  03431
Thrift Store: 132 Monadnock Highway  Swanzey, NH  03446
Monday – Saturday 9 – 5 pm
Provides help with food, clothing, and other material and financial assistance.
www.salvationarmyusa.org

 

WIC Program
352-7512

A program of Southwestern Community Services
63 Community Way  Keene, NH  03431

A supplementary food program offering nutritious foods,
nutrition education, breast feeding support and health care referral to
women with young children who qualify for the program.

www.scshelps.org


Clothing Resources

Linda’s Closet
603-357-1015

29 Center St., Keene, NH  03431

A clothing resource for women.
If you are returning to school, entering the work place,
returning to the work force, or living on a restricted budget,
Linda’s Closet can help acheive your job and career goals.

 

Monadnock Family Resource Center
Bonnie – 355-3040

Diapers, formula, baby wipes, shampoo, toothpaste &
brushes, deodorant, soap, lip balm, laundry detergent,
children’s books, wash cloths, towels, feminine products,
baby gates, baby food.

 

Under His Wings Clothing Ministry
603-239-4095

Winchester Assembly of God

Call for more information.

A clothing resource for men, women, and children of all ages.

 


A Healthy Halloween?

Vegan Halloween tips, sugar-free alternatives to
trick-or-treating

Isn’t there always one house in the neighborhood that hands
out raisins or sunflower seeds on Halloween, much to the
chagrin of all of the kids? If you don’t want your kids overdosing on
sugar and don’t feel right about handing out sticky gobs of pure
corn syrup to everyone else’s kids, then read on for some “tricks”
to finding “treats” that won’t contribute to the yacht fund of
your local dentist!
Plus, find out which Halloween candies are vegan.

Of course, you could always turn out the lights
and go to bed early, but if you’ve got kids, that’s hardly an option!
Here are my vegan Halloween ideas for a sugar-free or
healthy Halloween the whole family can enjoy.

Instead of candy or food, hand out stickers!

Kids love stickers, and they’re much more fun than raisins!
You can order super-cute vegetarian-themed stickers from PETA
for free, or drop by a craft store to pick up a variety of stickers
and let your trick-or-treaters choose.
Many larger malls also have specialty sticker or scrapbooking
stores that will have a large variety of fun designs.

Create a new tradition.

Perhaps even more important that what you do to celebrate
Halloween with your family is that you do something.
Establishing your own vegan-friendly Halloween traditions can be a
fun and special alternative to a week’s worth of sugar highs and lows.

Trick-or-Treating Alternatives

If you don’t want your own kids
trick-or-treating, here are a few alternatives:

  • Rent scary movies or dress up in your fabulous costumes
    and go out to the movies!
  • Get together with other vegan or health-concerned families
    and throw your own vegan Halloween party,
    complete with pumpkin carving, a costume contest,
    pin-the-bone-on-the-skeleton, and, of course, bobbing for apples!
  • Many churches, community centers and even shopping malls
    have Halloween festivals that provide a safe alternative
    to trick-or-treating.
     There is likely to be some candy at these
    events, but much less than with trick-or-treating.
    Check your local paper for announcements of these events.
  • Spend the evening baking some spooky Halloween treats together.
  • If you’ve got some artistic energy and live in a safe neighborhood,
    turn your home into a haunted house and invite
    trick-or-treaters in for a tour!

Hand out vegan candy

If you do want to hand out candy, there are lots of
vegan candies available. A word of caution, however,
vegan Halloween candies can be just as full of sugar and
high-fructose corn syrup as those containing animal products.
Or, shop at your local health food store to find some sugar-free
or healthier Halloween candies. Be sure to stop by the bulk bins
section as well, as there is usually some vegan candy in bulk bins.
Here’s an idea: hand out vegan chocolates that promote the
preservation of endangered species.
Who could feel guilty about that?

Don’t give in!

Of course you could always be “that house” that hands out
raisins and nuts or dried fruits. Sure all the neighborhood
kids will snicker, but the parents will love you, and
you’ll know that you did what you thought was best.

Just have a safe, happy and healthy Halloween…

 

July 22nd, 2013

  August 2013

  By Matt Guyette

 

 


Much of the Monadnock Region is covered by woods, some of which
have trails maintained for the pleasure of walkers and hikers. The
city of Keene maintains a paved walking and bicycling path which
runs from East to West Keene, and further unpaved paths branching
out to the south through Swanzey, and northwest through
Westmoreland.

These pathways follow the railway bed of the tracks which used to
run between Keene and Boston. These are multi-use paths which
are under development for road bikes, but are currently perfect for
mountain biking, hikers or off-road walkers, cross-country skiing,
snowshoeing, snow machines and horses.

Mount Monadnock, with trails off Route 124 in Jaffrey, is a symbol
of the Monadnock Region. 3,165 feet high, it is one of the most
climbed mountains in the world. The NH department of Parks and
Recreation offers a map of routes up the mountain, locations of
campgrounds, and other information found at www.nhstateparks.org

A volunteer from the Monadnock State Park also maintains an
informational website of interactive trail maps, altitudes and
distances of hikes, driving directions to the mountain and FAQ.

Trail Maps are available at the base station, or online at
www.qcc.mass.edu

* Goose Pond. A semi-wilderness area right in Keene. A small
parking lot is located off East Surry Road; a trail leads to the pristine
pond, and all the way around it.

Information: Keene Parks and Recreation Department, 603.357.9829.

* The Horatio Colony Preserve. A forested area off of West Hill in
Keene featuring 3.5 miles of hiking trails maintained by Antioch New
England Graduate School.

Information: Antioch New England, 800.553.8920, or
Keene Parks and Recreation Department, 603.357.9829
.

Keene; OTTER BROOK RECREATION AREA, Route 9, Keene.
This beach is maintained by the Army Corps of Engineers. Buoys mark
off  a swimming area that goes out to a 6-foot depth. Its 400 feet of
beach slopes out gradually. Visitors older than 12 pay $1, with a
maximum of $3 a car.
Otter Brook is mostly sunny but there are a few shade trees. Picnic
sites stretch along the river. There are no lifeguards on duty. Park
rangers maintain order at the beach and are certified in CPR.

The park has horseshoe pits, a ball field, two restrooms and a
changing facility. There are 55 fireplaces and 90 picnic tables.
Groups can rent a small picnic shelter for $40 per day. A larger one
rents for $60. Use of electricity is an additional $5. Water quality is
tested biweekly. Otter Brook is a river-fed beach. A boat launch is
available, but no gasoline driven motorboats are allowed.

The beach, open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., closes for the season the first
Sunday after Labor Day. There’s a carry-in, carry-out policy on trash.
A vehicle season pass is $25. No pets are allowed.

Keene Parks and Recreation Pools:
Wheelock Pool, Wheelock Park, Park Ave. and Robin Hood Pool,
Robin Hood Park, Reservoir Street

Pools will open June 19. Passes are on sale at the Rec Center.

Please note rates: Keene resident family $40, Keene resident adult
$25 (18+), Keene resident child $20 (6-17), Non-resident family $60,
Non-resident adult $35, Non-resident child $25, Daily rates without
a pass are $1 child, $2 adult.
Swim lessons first session registration June 21, 9 to noon at the pools.
Lessons begin June 23 and run 4 weeks (thru July 18). Resident $20,
non-resident $35. Second session registration July 19, lessons July 21
thru Aug 15. There will not be waterbaby or toddler classes, however
there will be “splash and laugh” sessions offered.
Interested people should call the Rec for details.

GOOSE POND

Just off Court Street. The City of Keene created Goose Pond in 1868 as
an additional water supply but stopped using the water in the 1930′s.
Trails and old roads lead into this area from many directions.
From the parking lot a trail leads uphill. It is an easy ten minute walk
to the pond. Then about a 45 minute walk around the pond.

Much more information about swimming in surrounding towns can
be found here:
http://www.keenenh.com/recreation/swimmingareas.asp

 


Here are 10 ways to stay well hydrated.

1. Two=Two. Two hours before activity, drink 2 cups (16 ounces) of fluids.

2. During exercise, drink 5 ounces of fluid every 15-20 minutes.
Take advantage of breaks in your workouts to stay hydrated
and keep your water bottle handy.
Every large gulp or swallow = about 1 ounce of fluid.

3. Only the fluid you drink can keep you hydrated.
Pouring fluids over your head to cool you off will feel good
but won’t keep you from getting dehydrated.

4. Plan a schedule of drinking so you drink before you get
thirsty. Don’t wait until you feel thirsty to drink fluids.

5. Choose sports drinks or light (calorie-reduced) sports drinks
if you are a heavy sweater and your exercise is of long duration
and high intensity, especially in hot, humid conditions.
A well formulated sports drink provides 6 to 8% carbohydrate
(14 to 19 grams of carbohydrate per 8 ounces) and 100 to 110
milligrams of sodium. Sports drinks help replace fluid,
carbohydrate, and sodium lost during exercise.

6. If you like (and can afford) coconut water, it provides
about the same calories as sports drinks but varies in
sodium content and is generally very high in potassium.
Some brands also contain fiber so you might find it upsets
your stomach if you drink a large volume of it during exercise.
Use our
guide to coconut waters to help.

7. After exercise, drink 2 to 3 cups (16 to 24 ounces) of fluid
for every pound of bodyweight lost during activity.
Weigh yourself before and after a workout to find out how
much water weight you usually lose.

8. Choose foods high in water; most fruits and vegetables are
high in water with the added bonus of providing needed
vitamins and minerals. A slice of watermelon on a hot summer
day is great snack and fluid booster.

9. Don’t over drink during long, strenuous exercise.
Drink enough to stay hydrated but if you gain weight after
exercise you are probably drinking too much.

10. Check out your urine. Monitor the volume and color of
your urine to determine your hydration level.
Lighter is better.


Protect Yourself

  • EEE and West Nile Virus
    EEE and West Nile Virus are caused by infected mosquitoes.
    Protect yourself by using insect repellent, wearing long-sleeved
    shirts, pants and socks when mosquitoes are biting, and eliminate
    standing water.
  • Lyme Disease –
    Lyme disease is transmitted to people when they are bitten by an
    infected tick. Protect yourself by using insect repellent, wearing
    long-sleeved shirts, pants and socks if your activity is in or around
    wooded and grassy areas.
    Always check for ticks on skin or clothing after being outdoors.
  • Rabies -
    Rabies is transmitted to humans by an infected animal. Do not touch,
    feed, pick up, or adopt wildlife or stray dogs or cats, even if they seem
    healthy or friendly. If you see an animal acting strangely, is behaving
    erratically, or seems disoriented or agressive call your animal control
    officer or park service. There have been a number of cases where
    people have friended wild animals that then turn out to be rabid.

June 2013

May 19th, 2013

By Matt Guyette 

 


Sun Poisoning Treatment

If you are sunburned, you will be anxious to relieve the intense burning as soon as possible. An easy homemade remedy for mild burns includes cold compresses that use a mix of equal parts milk and water. Another common home-treatment is to apply a cream or an aloe lotion, a few varieties of which should be available at any drugstore.
Don’t use a lotion with a topical anesthetic, however, as these can cause an allergic reaction on sensitive skin. Also, do not use an ointment that might prevent air from getting to the skin, which will only delay natural healing.
A plain cool bath could also relieve the burning. It’s best to not include soap or salts, etc. Your skin is very sensitive after a burn and these substances will likely sting. And be sure to draw the bath with cool water — not cold. Likewise, it’s good to drink cool — not cold — water. You’ll need to stay hydrated, but cold water can promote chills. After a bath, be gentle when drying the affected skin: Use soft towels and pat dry. Another option is silver sulfadiazine, which is a topical cream that treats and prevents infection for burned skin. Taking a painkiller or anti-inflammatory drug can help, too. Painkillers include things like acetaminophen (Tylenol), and a common anti-inflammatory is ibuprofen (Advil). Taking these early will help in particular. If you do see a doctor, he or she may prescribe stronger painkiller medication instead.
And, if you go to the hospital for dehydration, they will likely give you IV fluids. Going to the hospital might be a matter of life and death. It isn’t common, but sun poisoning has been known to lead to death. Repeated sunburns or sun poisoning can also cause death later in life due to skin cancer.


 

Adult Services (MDS)

Adult Service Coordination (ASC) provides assistance to individuals
over the age of 21 with intellectual disabilities, autism spectrum
disorders, cerebral palsy and other developmental disabilities.
Services are also available to adults with disorders such as traumatic
brain injury, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease and other
degenerative brain disorders.

The Adult Service Coordination team at MDS assists adults with
developmental and related disabilities as they identify personal goals,
and then secures the supports and resources required to achieve them.
Adult services are tailored to the needs of the individuals receiving
supports and those closest to them that share in the vision. We help
individuals, their families, guardians, friends and staff develop and
maintain the system of supports and services that enable individuals
to live in their communities, work, develop meaningful relationships,
and enjoy life to the fullest.


MDS/ISO

The Adult Individual Services Option at Monadnock Developmental Services (MDS-ISO) helps adults with disabilities to access supports and services based on an individual’s life plan. Our goal is to create rich learning environments for both staff and individuals receiving services by building on the relationship between learning and self-determination. This includes positive behavior change through Gentle Teaching — a process that recognizes the vital role of bonding and friendship in healthy human growth and development. Our services support each individual’s efforts to achieve autonomy and empowerment through self-determination.


With summer rapidly approaching here are some tips to help your diet during the season when frozen treats are the norm. As the weather gets warmer here are some tips for your summer diet. Just because the weather is warmer and schedules are changing does not mean you have to give up on your diet.

Water!
With warmer weather you body will sweat more. Be sure to keep water on hand and drink plenty of it. Try to avoid caffeinated, carbonated, and alcoholic drinks. Not only will it help you consume fewer calories, but drinks tend to contain chemicals that add to your water loss.
Seasonal Produce
As melons, lettuce, tomatoes, and other summer fruits and vegetables come into season be sure to eat the recommended 6 to 9 servings a day. Most summer produce is high in water content and fiber helping you eat less of other, heavier foods and will help keep you hydrated.
Adjust Workout Schedules
Try to workout early in the morning or later in the evening when it is not as hot out. That way your body can burn energy on the workout without overheating or dehydrating.
Cut High Fat and High Calorie Foods
Avoid greasy and fried foods as well as things like hot dogs and margaritas. These types of foods have a heated thermal effect on your body and make you feel lethargic. By cutting these out of your diet you will have more energy and consume fewer calories making it easier to burn more calories than you consume, boosting your summer diet.
Use Breath Mints and Gum
The taste of mint helps naturally curb your appetite. Before heading to that bbq or party pop a mint and help stop your continually grazing. Since you will not feel as hungry and your mouth feels fresh and clean you will be less likely to eat when you are not actually hungry.
Frozen Yogurt
Lets face it, during the hot summer months the urge to eat frozen treats is a constant. Instead of grabbing an ice cream bar go for frozen yogurt instead. It is low in fat and adds additional calcium to your diet.
Exercise Routine
Summer is the high time for vacation and travel which can really throw off ones workout schedule. Workout as regularly as you can, and try to be more physically active while vacationing when you are not doing your regular exercise regiment. Try taking a frisbee or football on your travels and enjoy the activity with your friends and family.
Eat Slower
Many people eat to fast which leads to over eating. After ever 3 or 4 bites stop, set your fork down, take a drink of water, and pause for a second. This will give your body a chance to tell you as you are getting full and you can stop before you over eat.
Do Not Buy Policy
Create a policy for yourself not to buy foods for your house that will tempt you to break your diet. If there is no ice cream in your freezer you will not be tempted to have it for a midnight snack. Things like sodas, candy, ice cream, and potatoes chips are fine in moderation, but if you tend to over indulge in them try just not buying them for a month. Instead keep health snacks and fruits to help curb your cravings on hand. At then end of the month you will find that your cravings for these types of foods had dropped.


Monadnock
Food Co-op

Keene, NH

The Monadnock Food
Co-op provides a diverse selection of local, organic, and natural foods
in the heart of downtown Keene. We offer bulk foods, meat, produce,
frozen food, dairy, and beer & wine departments, as well as a deli with
a prepared foods and grab-and-go section.
Come visit the co-op today!

April 2013

March 27th, 2013

     Chesco Chat

      By  Matt Guyette

 

 


 

Monadnock Family Resource Center

30 Washington Street, Keene, NH 03431

Phone: (603) 357-6870

Fax: (603) 357-8394

Offers a wide range of programs and services designed to make the
task of parenting a little easier. Programs include parenting
workshops, groups and home visiting programs.

• Baby Time is for Medicaid eligible pregnant moms in Cheshire
County. Home visitors are certified in a nationally recognized
parenting education program. The program provides moms
with health, parenting information, support and linkages to community
resources. It also includes visits from a nurse.

• Family Time provides services in the home to families who
need parenting support and linkages to community services.

• Mother Cares offers support to new moms by matching an
experienced volunteer with a new parent.

• Other programs include: Parent Outreach, Dads Time, All R
Kids and New Hampshire Employment Program.


Community Kitchen

37 Mechanic St., Keene, NH 03431

Phone: (603) 352-3200

www.thecommunitykitchen.org

Provides free meals in a comfortable setting to all people in the Monadnock Region
Mon. – Wed., Fri. 5-6:30 and Sundays 11-12:30.
Take home boxes of food are available on
Wednesdays from 12:30-5:30 p.m.
and Thursdays from 11:30-4:00 p.m.
Provides information on food pantries in outlying communities.
Free clothing available.


Project Share Thrift Shop

Keene Recreation Center

312 Washington Street, Keene, NH 03431

Phone: (603) 352-8464

Provides clothing, small furniture, linens, household and
miscellaneous items to those in need for a small fee.

Saint James Church

44 West Street, Keene, NH 03431

Phone: (603) 352-1019; www.stjameskeene.org

Thrift store hours: Mon.-Fri., 10-4; Sat. 10-2.

Helps individuals find the household and clothing items they need.

Salvation Army

15 Roxbury Plaza, Keene, NH 03431

Phone: (603) 352-0607

Provides help with food (food pantry and food voucher system),
counseling, information and referral services, social, educational,
recreational and religious programs for adults and children.

Thrift Store:

132 Monadnock Highway

Swanzey, NH 03446

Phone: (603) 357-2207

Mon.-Sat. 9-5

Provides clothing and other material assistance.

www.salvationarmyusa.org

Community Support Program

17  93rd Street, Keene, NH 03431

Phone: (603) 357-5270


New England Gardening Advice,
By the Month -April

The month of April truly ushers in the season of Spring in New
England. Snowdrops, crocuses, and then daffodils seem to sprout
and bloom overnight, usually on the heels of a two or three day
warm spell. These occur in the early part of April in the south coastal
regions of Rhode Island, Connecticut, and Massachusetts, and in the
latter part of the month in New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine.

As soon as the outside temperatures allow, its time to remove any
dead or decaying matter in your New England garden that may be
covering up your spring flowers. Its important to rake the garden beds
BEFORE they start growing or you can damage the plants, removing
the flowers accidentally or even killing the plant before it gets a
chance to flower and set leaves. What to do with allthat stuff you
raked out of the garden? If you have the room, we highly suggest
buying a small composter from your local garden shop. They will run
you between $50 and $100 and are invaluable to keeping your garden
weed-free, fertilized and reducing the burden on your watering can.
If you don’t have the room, most towns have pickup days during the
month where they’ll take garden refuse or a landfill close by.

If you have a vegetable garden, or are planning one for this year, now
is also the time to turn over the soil from your annual vegetable areas
and rake any debris covering perennial vegetables such as asparagus.
Again, doing this early makes clean up MUCH easier than trying to
work the soil around the vegetables later on after they are established
and growing. Believe it or not, by the end of April you can plant peas
and lettuce in most of New England directly by seed in the ground for
a beautiful spring crop of snow peas and boston lettuce. These
vegetables love the cooler days and nights and actually grow much
better than in summer heat.

Lastly, if you are inclined to grow your own vegetables from seed,
many of the summer ripening varieties of tomato especially will
benefit from an early headstart from seed on a sunny windowsill. If
you don’t have adequate light, however, the seedlings can become
long and weak over the next 8 weeks and may be unusable in the
garden. So, be sure you have them in a south facing window that
gets at least 4-5 hours of direct sun daily. On warm days, open the
window and let the breeze blow on the plants. This helps to harden
the tissue on the stem so that when you plant them outside, their
stems will be able to take the strain of blowing in the wind. It can
take up to two weeks to “harden” plants from windowsill to garden
so every little bit helps along the way.


 

The Home, Flowerand Garden Show of Southwest New Hampshire!
Friday April 5 – Sunday April 7! The Show is held in the Ice Arena, rain or shine, at the Cheshire
County Fairgrounds. 247 Monadnock Highway ( route 12) Swanzey, NH

More information found online…