September 23rd, 2016

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October 2016

By Matt Guyette


Monadnock Pumpkin Festival

When: Saturday, October 15, 2016

Where: Cheshire Fair Grounds, 247 Monadnock Hwy., Swanzey, NH

This family-friendly event includes carved pumpkin displays, a carving contest, a children’s costume parade, a pumpkin catapult, a craft fair, pony rides and a Fright Fest haunted fairgrounds area. Admission is $5 and kids 5 and under are free.

Visit monadnockpumpkinfestival.org for more information.

New Hampshire Pumpkin Festival (formerly, the Keene Pumpkin Festival)

When: October 22, 2016

Where: Downtown in Laconia, NH

Visit nhpumpkinfestival.com for more information.


Seasonal Influenza

Don’t let the flu get you this season! What You Should Know for the 2016-2017 Influenza Season

2016-2017 Influenza Season

  • WHO should get a yearly flu vaccine? The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends an annual flu vaccine for everyone six months of age and older including pregnant women and people who have chronic health conditions. Vaccination to prevent influenza is particularly important for people who are at high risk for serious complications from influenza.
  • Preventive Steps 1. Take time to get a flu vaccine 2. Take everyday preventive actions to stop the spread of germs. 3. Take flu antiviral drugs if your doctor prescribes them
  • WHERE can I get the flu vaccine? Flu vaccines are offered by many doctor’s offices, clinics, health departments, pharmacies and college health centers, as well as by many employers, and even by some schools. Even if you don’t have a regular doctor or nurse, you can get a flu vaccine somewhere else, like a health department, pharmacy, urgent care clinic, and often your school, college health center, or work.

Granite State Independent Living (GSIL) is a statewide nonprofit organization whose mission is to promote life with independence for people with disabilities and seniors through advocacy, information, education, support and transition services.

  • -At Granite State Independent Living we believe in the importance of mutual RESPECT and we celebrate diversity.
  • -At Granite State Independent Living we believe all individuals should have CHOICES.
  • -At Granite State Independent Living we believe in individual EMPOWERMENT.
  • -At Granite State Independent Living we believe that all individuals have the right to define their own level of INDEPENDENCE.
  • -At Granite State Independent Living we believe in COLLABORATION.Keene, NH Office 105 Castle Street, Room 7 Keene, NH 03431 603-228-9680 1-800-826-3700 (toll-free) | 603-903-0869 (fax)
  • -At Granite State Independent Living everything we do is done with INTEGRITY.

Cedarcrest Center for Children with Disabilities

91 Maple avenue

Keene, NH 3431

United States

603 358 3384

603 358 3389

Contact Name: 

Cathy Gray

http://www.cedarcrest4kids.org

Cedarcrest Center offers children with special medical and educational needs a healthy, safe environment where they can grow and develop to their fullest potential. The Center provides a calm, comfortable setting in which children are surrounded by caring, dedicated staff who encourage and nurture them every moment of the day.

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July 27th, 2016

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August 2016

By Matt Guyette


Summer fruits and health benefits

      Watermelon – this summer fruit not only helps to quench the thirst but is also a good source of beta carotene, vitamin C, pectin, lycopene, potassium and iron.

       Apricots – fresh apricots are good source of iron, vitamin C, beta carotene, potassium and fiber. Dried apricots help people with fluid retention and constipation. The health benefits of apricots includes anemia, cancer, skin diseases, fevers, earache, indigestion and constipation.

       Berries – enjoy most of the berries in summer. Strawberries with stem intact can be stored up to one year with or without added sugar. The phytochemicals in blue berries, blackberries, strawberries helps boost immunity, have a protective effect against cancer, protects against heart diseases and circulatory problems. Cranberries have a healing effect in urinary tract infection.

        Peaches and plums – contain good amount of vitamin C, beta carotene, antioxidant phytochemicals and anthocyanins all of which help to eliminate the free radicals from the body.

        Papayas and mangoes – both are excellent source of vitamin C, beta carotene, vitamin A and fiber. Eating sufficient amount of mangoes alone can make the body a rich store of vitamin A which lasts for months.

        Cherries – bright red cherries not only taste great but also contain ellagic acid which inhibits the growth of carcinogenic cells in the body.

        Pineapples – besides being packed with most of the vitamins and minerals, pineapple is a very good source of an enzyme bromelain which aids digestion.

Run…Bike…Hike…Play and experience the Paths of Keene!

Welcome to the beautiful Keene area, nestled in the southwest corner of New Hampshire offering unique recreational opportunities to people of all ages and interest – biking, jogging, or walking.KeenePaths.com hopes that people who live in the area or are visiting can enjoy our beautiful outside. Enjoy your journey through forests, fields and a vibrant downtown filled with shops and restaurants.

We envision opportunities for you to enhance your health and well-being by enjoying your outside experience on our trails and parks. Our trails are paved, gravel or natural to offer a variety of experiences – downtown to forested parks and active farms for all levels of experience and expectations.

Otter Brook Lake U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Phone: 603-352-4130

Location: From Keene, East 2 miles on NH 9 to recreation area, Keene

Activities & Amenities: Summer season the park offers dozens of picnic tables and over 50 fireplace grills, group shelters, a ball field, potable water and sanitary facilities. Swimming opportunities include a 400-foot-long beach with a change house. Boating is available via a boat ramp for canoes, rowboats, sailboats, and boats with electric motors. Gas-powered motors are welcome to 10HP: larger motors may be conditionally used by permit, available from park rangers. Hunting and fishing are both permitted any season, subject to state laws and regulations. There are no trash receptacles at Otter Brook Lake, it is a Carry-in Carry-out trash facility. No Entry or Use Fees

Fruits to be eaten during summer

What are summer fruits?

Like the name suggests, the term “summer fruits” refers to a variety of fruits that are easily available, during the summer season. During the summer it is common for people to lose their appetites, which makes them stay away from rich and heavy foods. Fruits that are juicy and tart seem to be the most naturally cooling effect on the body, during summers. Hence, when it gets too hot, several people rely exclusively upon recipes made using summer fruits and vegetables. Summer fruits can be used in a variety of foods and beverages. However, in addition to satisfying the taste buds and refreshing the body, most summer fruits are very healthy. This is because they are very high in vitamins and minerals, antioxidants, phyto-chemicals and fiber. The amount of fat that is present in most of the summer fruits is negligible, but there can be some exceptions. Moreover, since the water content of most summer fruits is between 80% and 90%, they can help add a healthy and radiant glow on the skin.

List of summer fruits

There are several varieties of fruits that are available during the summer. Given below is a lost of some of the most common summer fruits, as well as the health benefits that are associated with it.

• Apricots: High in Beta carotene, which gets converted to Vitamin A by the body
• Berries: High in antioxidants and help the body fight off several diseases
• Cherries: Contain diuretic properties, as well as Vitamin C
• Honeydew melon: Help treating infections in the urinary tract
• Mangoes: Rich in Vitamin C & E & also contain potassium, iron & nicotinic acid
• Nectarines: Can help with fluid retention, constipation and high cholesterol
• Papayas: Great for weight loss and can also help in improving digestion. It is often used as a natural remedy for constipation too.
• Peaches: Can reduce anemia, fatigue as well as high cholesterol
• Pineapples: Contains antioxidants that protect the body against diseases. Also great for digestion and weight loss.
• Watermelons: Can help treat kidney, bladder and other digestive problems

 Once in season, it is easy to purchase these summer fruits and vegetables from anywhere, like a fruit market, or a grocery store. These fruits can all be mixed together to make a tasty and nutritious fruit salad or a smoothie. Fixing a salad is very easy as compared to other recipes. For those who are not really watching their weight, a summer fruit trifle could make a tempting dessert.
Summer is the season where the sun rays are at their highest peak. To stay well hydrated is very important in these days. Although most of the fruits like apples, bananas, or pears are now available through out the year, some fruits are seasonal.Aug2016back

May 25th, 2016

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June 2016

by Matt Guyette


Tips to avoid the dangers of overexposure to the sun and heat during summer activities

Excessive heat and ultraviolet (UV) radiation are dangerous to people’s health. Each year, more people on average die in the U.S. from heat waves than from any other natural disaster. And every hour, one American dies from skin cancer, which is the most common cancer in the U.S.

During the summer months, days are longer and more people are outside for longer periods of time, increasing the health risks from heat exhaustion and overexposure to the sun. Cities and suburbs are particularly vulnerable to higher temperatures during the summer.

Many cities and suburbs have air temperatures that can be up to 22 degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the surrounding countryside. Buildings and roads intensify heat and UV dangers as they absorb the sun’s rays and radiate the heat back throughout the day and night, known as the heat island effect. Heat islands can intensify heat waves. To help reduce the heat island effect, plant trees, shrubs, and vines, which create shade and protect people from UV radiation.

To avoid heat exhaustion and overexposure to the sun, follow these steps to stay cool and safe this summer:

Stay hydrated.

Wear lightweight clothing. To keep your body temperature down and stay protected from UV radiation, wear lightweight, light-colored, and loose-fitting clothing.

Apply sunscreen. Approximately 30 minutes before heading outside, apply SPF 15 or higher sunscreen, and reapply every two hours.

Protect your eyes and face. Wear a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses to protect your eyes from sun damage and the development of cataracts.

Seek shade. Find shade during the sun’s peak hours between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. to reduce the risk of too much sun exposure

Teach sun and heat safety. Keep an eye on others, particularly the elderly, remind them to be safe in the sun and the heat. Watch for signs of heat illnesses, which can include hot and dry skin, confusion, hallucinations, and aggression.

Check the UV Index. When planning outdoor activities check the UV Index to identify the times that pose the greatest risk for overexposure to the sun.

Check the Air Quality Index. On hot summer days, ozone levels can rise making the air unhealthy to breathe so be sure to check the air quality index before heading outside.


The Farmers’ Market of Keene
The market offers a great selection of vegetables, fruits, dairy products, meat, eggs, preserves, wines, and maple products. Bakers are also present selling breads, cookies, granola, and other tempting treats. And don’t forget to check out the local crafters selling furniture, soaps, and jewelry. 
Saturday, May 7 on Gilbo Ave from 9a.m. to 1p.m. The market will be held Tuesdays and Saturdays through October.


Importance of Hydration in the Summer Heat

It’s that time of the year when we not only have to concentrate on eating healthy, but on staying properly hydrated too. The summer heat can cause discomforting symptoms if regular and adequate fluids are not consumed.

Water is one of the most important components of our daily diets. Water helps lubricate internal surfaces, flushes toxins through the kidneys, transports nutrients throughout the body, maintains healthy blood pressure, regulates body temperature and sustains healthy vital organs.

Symptoms of Dehydration

Dehydration can happen at any time of the year in any weather condition. Summer heat seems to bring on more instances of dehydration due to larger losses of body fluid through sweating. Be conscious of the following symptoms to help prevent or treat dehydration:

  • Dry mouth
  • Headache
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Irritability
  • Tiredness
  • Decreased urination
  • Constipation
  • Dizziness
  • Fever
  • Delirium

Water Consumption Recommendations

The National Institute of Medicine recommends about 3 liters of fluid for males and 2 liters for women. This includes all beverages like coffee, juice, water, tea, milk etc. Additional fluid may be needed but can generally be found in the moisture of foods. The general recommendation for eight 8 oz glasses of water per day converts to about 1.9 liters. This amount would be sufficient for most women, males need slightly more. Exercise and excessive sweating cause extra water loss and create higher fluid needs. Be sure to maintain proper hydration before, during and after strenuous exercise, especially in the summer heat.

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March 25th, 2016

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April 2016

Matt Guyette


Mind

A mental spring cleaning gives us the opportunity to clear our mind, get rid of habits that don’t serve us, plant seeds of positivity and start creating the life we want, says Susan Pearse, co-author of Wired for Life: Retrain your Brain and Thrive. She has these three simple tips to spring clean your mind:

  1. Start meditating– spend 5 minutes in nature a day or even better ensure you are awake and fully there for every conversation, task and experience.
  2. Dissolve negative behaviours– have a whinge-free day or set aside time for a “stress ban”. “Challenge the way you think and see things from a different perspective,” Susan says.
  3. Do activities that nourish your brain– visit an art gallery, choose a magazine you’d never normally read or study a language. “Keep your neural networks firing and growing.”

Blueberry Fields

For seventeen years Blueberry Fields has provided for the natural living needs of Keene residents from its unique and easily accessible site on Emerald Street. From 2006 to 2013, Blueberry Fields has won the People’s Choice Award every year as the Best Natural Food store in the Keene Shopper voting; thereby, validating its approach to natural living.


34 Cypress Street, Keene, NH Mon– Sat, 7 a.m. – 9 p.m. Sun 9 a.m. – 9 p.m. (603) 355-8008

The Monadnock Food Co-op’s Healthy Food for All Program, is an initiative that gives more people access to healthy, local and organic food options.  The program’s launch coincided with Monadnock Food Co-op’s event A Place a the Table Event in Keene, sparking more conversation and collective action around hunger, obesity and national food policy in United States.

The Healthy Food for All Program assists low income community members  by offering them a10% discount on everything they purchase, except alcohol, and was developed with the support of the Cooperative Fund of New England and the Neighboring Food Co-op Association. In order to apply, customers should see the Customer Service Manager with proof that they receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Women, Infants, Children (WIC), Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits, or with a letter from The Community Kitchen of Keene demonstrating their need.


Recharge your health for spring

Has spring snuck up on you and suddenly you realise you are not emotionally or physically ready to throw yourself into the warmer weather?

Here are some easy-to-action tips to help you spring clean your health today.

Diet

Spring is a great time to conduct a diet audit and see which areas can be improved, says Nutrition Australia spokesperson Orla Hugueniot.  One of the best ways to fix the family diet is to get into the habit of meal planning. “There are lots of tools online to help you set up a meal plan. And it means you shop in advance for what you need and always have the ingredients on hand.” As part of this plan and audit, try to build in the five serves a day of vegetables you need to stay healthy. “Spring is a great time for light soups, veggie-rich stirfries and nourishing salads,” Orla says. And check your fibre content. “Most of us don’t get anywhere near the 35g-30g of fibre we need a day. A diet rich in grains and fruit and veg will help this,” she adds.  Fibre supplements such as Metamucil are also a delicious, convenient way to add essential fibre to your diet. Start your day with Fibrecaps Metamucil into at least 250ml of water for a quick and easy fibre hit.

Exercise

Give your body some shock treatment and overhaul – or restart – your exercise routine, says Adelaide personal trainer Ryan Willets. He’s not meaning you need to head straight out and run a marathon, but if you’ve had a sluggish winter you need “to shock the body in spring and reap the benefits in summer”. He understands that seeing a shining golden ball in the sky may not be enough motivation for many of us, he has another simple tip. “Buy something new to train in. It could just be a cheap singlet or some sports socks but it can inspire you to get out an exercise.” If you’re hitting the great outdoors again for the first time in a while, “stay on top of your hydration levels”.  “Once you head outside to exercise again, you will need to monitor your water intake or you will be come quickly fatigued or cramp up and not enjoy exercising,” Ryan says.

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January 25th, 2016

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February 2016

By Matt Guyette

 

 

 


 

Tips For Winter Wellness

  1. Go for a walk even when the weather is really cold – your body has to work overtime to get warm and you may burn up to 50% more calories than you would on the same walk in summer! But remember, go a little slower until you get warm and keep up the hydration.
  2. If you find it hard to get motivated to exercise in winter…just think of spring and how much harder it is to get back into shape rather than maintain your fitness throughout the winter.
  3. Be aware of tendonitis and stress fracture if you don’t exercise in winter and expect to pick up where you left off after a whole winter with no exercise.
  4. Instead of picking up a cup of hot chocolate to keep yourself warm, try a herbal beverage.
  5. Gain an interest in indoor sports as opposed to cycling and jogging outdoors. Don’t forget that swimming at an indoor pool is an option for a great cardio workout!
  1. The cold air and indoor heaters can dry out your skin. Make sure you drink at least 8 glasses of water each day and use moisturizers throughout winter.
  2. Buy some indoor plants to soften up the dry atmosphere caused through heating. Indoor plants give off moisture and oxygen and the colours will brighten up a dull day outside.
  3. Caught a cold or flu? If the infection is above the neck (nose, throat) you could be OK to complete a low intensity workout. However, if you have symptoms that are worse than an average cold (chest congestion, muscle aches), exercise will only make you worse and delay your recovery. Rest is the best medicine.
  4. Wear the right clothes when exercising in winter. Polypropylene is the perfect fabric to wear underneath a tracksuit, which will provide great insulation but minimise moisture loss. Gore-Tex is a fabric used widely for providing protection from the rain and wind.
  5. Feel like sitting on the couch with a video and snacking on a cold, wet day? Reach for a protein bar or packet of soy nuts instead of high energy, high fat snacks.

 

The American Red Cross is glad to work with the media in getting the word to NH residents about ways to plan, prepare for and respond to disasters and other life-threatening emergencies.

We send out news releases whenever the Red Cross responds to a local or regional disaster. Please let the Communications Director know if you want to receive those releases.

We also can provide Red Cross experts for live or taped interviews on disaster response and preparedness subjects, or training in health and safety or medical careers. Give us a call.

The Red Cross also sends out Public Service Announcements and public access Community Bulletin Board listings.

For any questions, please call the Communications Department at 1-800-464-6692 or cell at 603-545-8038.

Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about the humanitarian services of the Red Cross.

Keene

83 Court Street

Keene, NH 03431

603-352-3210

Office Hours: 8:30 am – 3:00 pm


Our Mission

The Monadnock Food Co-op is cooperatively owned and operated by people in our community, and exists to meet our community’s need for:

  • An accessible, community-owned downtown food market
  • A marketplace that welcomes and connects community
  • A healthy, sustainable food system
  • The support of local farmers and producers
  • Appropriate education and training for the community
  • A strong, sustainable and improving local economy

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November 20th, 2015

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December 2015

By Matt Guyette

 

 


Tis the Season for Healthy Holiday Eating The holiday season can seem like on giant smorgasbord. And, for anyone not interested in bulging waistlines, this holiday obstacle course of high-fat foods, alcohol, and calories can seem insurmountable. Here are tips from weight management experts that can help make your holiday season a healthy one.

Don’t try to diet during the holidays. Set a goal of trying to maintain your present weight. That way, you have a realistic goal. You allow yourself to indulge here and there, but you don’t go over the edge.

Pace, don’t race. Pay attention to how quickly you eat and exactly what you eat and drink. Savor the flavor by eating slowly and choosing your food carefully

Remember that alcohol is packed with calories, choose light beer and wine over mixed drinks. A holiday-sized mixed drink can have as many as 500 calories or more.

Offer to bring a favorite low-calorie dish to holiday parties, so you know there will be at least one “safe” item available. Stand far away from buffets so you’re not tempted to nibble constantly.

Make the effort to continue a regular exercise program. Exercise will help keep extra calories away, but it also can reduce the stress of social events and family get-togethers.

Don’t go to a party or event on an empty stomach. Before going out, snack on protein, like chicken or cottage cheese. Protein satisfies and helps you eat less. Some people have the idea that if they skip lunch, or don’t eat all day, they can eat more later, but skipping meals means you’re hungry, and your chances of overeating later are much higher.

Keep an eye on your portion sizes. In the heat of celebration, portion sizes can be excessive. Instead of eating a large amount of food, try to eat a large variety of foods.

Don’t let a hectic holiday schedule force you to eat fast food. Prepare and freeze several quick, healthy meals. That way, you have an option other than high-fat, fast-food meals.

When the party is at your house, put low-calorie and fat-free salad dressings on the menu. Pack the table with flavorful vegetable dishes, and make reduced-fat versions of your family’s favorite traditional dishes.

Make decisions about what you’re going to eat. Weight management is all about moderation and making healthy decisions.

Cheshire County assistance programs.

Financial assistance from your town

The various towns and cities in Cheshire County New Hampshire offer assistance to those who qualify. Individuals and families may get help with paying rent, utilities, heating expenses, free food and certain prescription medications. In addition, the towns are a great place to stop by to get referrals to local charities and non-profits, and to gain access to various government assistance programs. All towns are required to provide these resources to residents per New Hampshire state laws. Keene New Hampshire (603) 357-9809. Roxbury and Surry also offer aid. Phone (603) 352-3075

Cheshire Community Action Agency – Southwestern Community Services, Inc.

Electric Bill Assistance Program – This option provides qualifying PSNH customers with a discount on their monthly electric and utility bills.

Fuel Assistance Program – This is a resource that provides financial assistance for paying heating bills and utility expenses to handicapped, elderly, and low-income residents.

Rent help and eviction prevention – This particular assistance program offers eviction prevention services, including landlord/tenant mediation, budget counseling, one-time financial supports, and referrals to other resources and non-profits.

Neighbor Helping Neighbor Program – This is an energy assistance program that provides funds and emergency help for paying utility bills as well as energy assistance (electric or natural gas) to needy families and individuals who are experiencing some type of financial hardships, if the family has a disconnection pending, and if the family is ineligible for help from the Fuel Assistance Program.

Food Pantry – Can help people provide food for their family.

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September 29th, 2015

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2015 Monadnock Pumpkin Festival  

Keeping 25 years of Tradition Alive!

Come Join the Fun! The Monadnock Pumpkin Festival is being held at the
Cheshire Fairgrounds in Swanzey, NH, this year. This family-friendly event
features The Great Pumpkin Mile*, A huge Children’s Activity tent, Baking
Contest, Carving Contest, Fireworks Display by Atlas Fireworks, a Pumpkin
Catapult contest, Children’s Costume Parade, Amusement Rides*, Costume
contest, Fright Fest at the Pumpkin Fest!*, Thousands of Lit Jack O’Lanterns,
street performers and Live entertainment presented by the Keene Music Festival.

Saturday, October 24th, 2015

10:00am-8:00pm

Cheshire Fair Grounds

247 Monadnock Highway

Swanzey, NH 03446

 


The Community Kitchen Food Pantry Keene, NH

The Community Kitchen Food Pantry is a food pantry. Documentation Required: For all household members: proof of name, address, income, date of birth; prefer photo ID. Food pantry service hours: Wednesdays 12:30-5:30pm and Thursday: 11:30am-4pm. .  * Make sure you check by calling the food pantry to confirm that they still are in operation and the hours as the hours have not changed.  Do you have items to donate? Contact The Community Kitchen Food Pantry at the phone number provided above to see if they can use any items you may have to donate.

 

Southwestern Community Services assistance programs.

Cheshire and Sullivan County New Hampshire residents are served by the Southwestern Community Services. A goal of the non-profits to help low income, unemployed, and struggling families get back on the path to self-sufficiency. That is the focus.

However, some short term assistance, or referrals to financial aid, may be available as resources allow. A main goal is to prevent homeless and utility disconnection, especially for seniors, families with children, and the disabled.

Energy bill assistance and conservation

SCS Energy Services runs several assistance programs, including some crisis components, that are especially designed to help the residents of Cheshire and Sullivan Counties. Their programs include the Electric Assistance Program, Fuel Assistance, the Senior Energy Assistance Program and also the Neighbor Helping Neighbor Program.

The Electric Assistance Program helps qualified low income customers get a rebate or credit on their monthly power bill. Qualifying factors include the household gross income and the type of space heating installed in the home. Cheshire and Sullivan families can apply for the Electric Assistance Program any time during the year.

Residents over the age of 60 can look into the Senior Energy Assistance Program. It provides funding and energy assistance funds to low-income Cheshire and Sullivan residents who otherwise not capable of caring for themselves with appropriate supportive services.

The New Hampshire Fuel Assistance Program provides funds and cash grants for heating, natural gas and utility expenses to handicapped, elderly, and low-income residents of Cheshire and Sullivan counties.

Southwestern Community Services has a few locations in the area. They are as follows.

  • Cheshire County, 63 Community Way, Keene, New Hampshire 03431, call 603.352.7512 or dial toll Free: 800.529.0005
  • Sullivan County, 96-102 Main Street, Claremont, NH 03743. The phone number is 603.542.9528.

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July 29th, 2015

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August 2015

By
Matt Guyette

 


10 HEALTH BENEFITS OF DRINKING WATER IN SUMMER

Drinking moderate amount of water in summer carries several health benefits for individuals. Our body carries 70% water thus needs adequate quantity of it to function properly.

Let’s see what does drinking 7-8 glass of water a day truly bring for your health and how much beneficial it is to keep body and muscles regulated on hot days.

  1. Weight loss. Water is an effective appetite suppressant. So, consuming water cuts down hunger and reduces need for extra meals. That results in losing valuable weight and keeping one fit and healthy during summer.
  2. Water is a wonder drug dealing dehydration. 7-9 glass water intake a day regulates body temperature and replaces the essential electrolytes lost due to excessive sweating.
  3. For mental health, mental creativity and mental productivity water plays vital role. Consuming sufficient amount of water liquefies brain blood that makes brain more efficient, creative and productive. You think better and thus work better. It also combats sudden mental strokes during summer and cures headache as well.
  4. Drinking good quantity of water flushes out toxins and poisonous compounds out of body. It regulates digestion avoiding constipation, acidity, kidney stone and stomach cramps.
  5. More the heart pumps water more it becomes strong and protects against heart attacks. Thus drinking water makes heart healthy. It also increases blood flow to the heart enhancing its health.
  6. Drinking adequate amount of water rejuvenates skin. It keeps skin hydrated making it radiant and glowy. It also combats acne and aging.
  7. When body exhausts, water works like an energy drink. It boosts energy in body fighting against fatigue, dizziness, sluggishness, lethargy and other heat related illness.
  8. Drinking moderate amount of water a day lubricates muscles and joints that is a cure against cramps and sprains.
  9. Water deals various diseases such as giddiness, bloating, belching, obesity, anemia, cough, irregular menstruation and urogenital diseases.
  10. It is simply starting a day with consuming 5-6 glass of water altogether. Water therapy is useful in dealing hormonal problems, blood pressure, kidney related problems and heart attack.

 

Neighbor Helping Neighbor (SCS)

This program provides funds for utility energy assistance (electric or natural gas) to needy individuals who are experiencing hardships, have disconnects pending, and are ineligible for help from the Fuel Assistance Program. (This non-profit charitable funding is generously supported by corporate matching contributions from customers and employees of Unitil/Concord Electron, Keyspan, Unitil/Exeter & Hampton Electric, Granite State Electric, Northern Utilities, Natural Gas, and Public Service of New Hampshire.)

 

Cooling Tips

  • Use the thermostat on your air conditioner/dehumidifier so it will cycle on and off only as needed.
  • Attics should be properly vented to reduce heat build-up from the sun.
  • Compact fluorescent lights use 75% less electricity than regular bulbs. Consider using compact fluorescents for most commonly used lighting.
  • Invest in energy efficient appliances. Look for appliances with the ENERGY STAR label.
  • Close windows and shades on hot sunny days.
  • At night, open the lowest living level window and correspondingly highest and furthest away living level window to use the building’s natural stack effect (warm air rises) to draw out warm air to be replaced with cooler night air.

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May 29th, 2015

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   June 2015

    By Matt Guyette

 

 

Mosquito Season is Here – Public Urged to Take Precautions

Warmer weather is finally here and southern New England residents are no doubt spending more time outdoors. However, with increased outdoor activity, the public is at risk of becoming a meal for summer’s most dangerous and pesky pest – the mosquito. As such, Braman Termite and Pest Elimination, a pest management company servicing southern New England, is urging the public to take preventative measures to protect themselves and their families. “Mosquitoes are emerging across the country due to recent rainfall and an increase in temperatures,” said Jerry Lazarus, third-generation owner of Braman Termite and Pest Elimination “With the threat of West Nile virus and other mosquito-borne diseases, it’s important for people to take the necessary precautions to prevent mosquito bites when spending time outdoors in the coming months.” The National Pest Management Association (NPMA), a nonprofit organization committed to the protection of public health, food and property from household pests, offers the following tips to avoid becoming a mosquito meal:

  • Eliminate areas of standing water around the home such as flowerpots, birdbaths, baby pools, grill covers and other objects where water collects. Improperly pitched gutters are frequent breeding sources. Mosquitoes need only about a ½ inch of water to breed.
  • Screen all windows and doors. Repair even the smallest tear or hole.
  • Minimize outside activity between dusk and dawn, when mosquitoes are most active. If you must be outside during those times, consider staying inside a screened-in porch or dressing in clothing that leaves very little exposed skin.
  • Avoid wearing dark colors, loose-fitting garments, and open-toe shoes.
  • Always use an insect repellant containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535 or oil of lemon eucalyptus when spending time outdoors or traveling, especially in areas known to have increased mosquito populations.

Diethyl-meta-toluamide, also called DEET (/dt/) or diethyltoluamide, is a slightly yellow oil. It is the most common active ingredient in insect repellents. It is intended to be applied to the skin or to clothing, and provides protection against mosquitos, ticks, fleas, chiggers, leeches, and many other biting insects.

 

Adopt-a-Highway

“The Adopt-a-Highway program, also known as Sponsor-a-Highway, is a promotional campaign undertaken by U.S. statesprovinces and territories of Canada, in addition to national governments outside North America to encourage volunteers to keep a section of a highway free from litter. In exchange for regular litter removal, an organization is allowed to have its name posted on a sign in the section of the highways they maintain.”

Chesco is involved with this program. We are responsible for a section of Route 10 leading up to the Gilsum town line, and a sign credits Chesco for litter removal. We collected 27 bags of trash our first time out and we will go 3 more times this year. There are many volunteers from Chesco who participate; it is fun and it feels great to help improve our community!

 

Keene Public Library

Beginning May 30, 2015, and continuing through the summer, the library will be closing at 1 pm on Saturdays.  Saturday open hours through September 5, 2015, are 9 am – 1 pm.  On September 12 we will resume our regular 9 am -5 pm Saturday hours.

 

Summer Precautions Against Ticks

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), seven varieties of ticks in the United States transmit diseases to humans.  It’s important when you are out this summer that you take a few precautions: 1) Avoid contact with ticks.  Use a repellent and wear light colored clothes.  2) While bathing and showering check carefully for ticks.  3) Immediately remove ticks with a pair of tweezers.  Grasp the tick as close to the surface of your skin as possible.  4) Watch for symptoms of tick-borne diseases.  Symptoms include fever, aches and pains, chills, and can sometimes be followed by a rash.  Should you experience any of these symptoms you should contact your physician immediately.

 

 

 

March 31st, 2015

April2015front

April 2015

By

Matt Guyette


 

Disability Rights Center – NH, 1-800-834-1721

If you or someone you know has a TBI, we can provide: • information and referral • advocacy • legal representation

Here are some examples of the types of problems we may be able to assist on:

  • You are being discriminated against because of a TBI.
  • Your child had a brain injury, and is not doing well at school. Schools are required to identify children who are eligible for special education, and to provide special education to children who need an individualized education. Some children with TBI who are eligible for special education do not receive it. Other children with TBI receive special education, but do not receive appropriate services.
  • You are having difficulty finding or keeping a job because of a TBI.
  • You were denied Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income, Aid to the Permanently and Totally Disabled, or other Public Benefits.
  • You require housing, assistive technology or other types of service to live more independently or in the community.
  • You (or someone you know) is in prison, jail, or other facility and you are not getting medical or other services you need due to your TBI.

 

Adult Service Coordinators at MDS work with individuals and their families to:

  • -Create an environment that empowers individuals to speak out for themselves and receive the highest quality services available;
  • -Search for opportunities, connections and ways to make the seemingly impossible probable;
  • -Offer information, explore options and network with others;
  • -Increase community awareness of the talents and gifts those with disabilities can offer.

Ladies’ Wildwood Park

A 15.4 acre wooded parkThe park was created in 1890 when a stately grove of trees was threatened by development. Unfortunately the hurricane of 1938 leveled most of the original grove. The City replanted with red pines and a few hugh white pines are all that remain from the original woods. The park is mostly flat and criss-crossed with trails.  To get there: The park is located at the intersection of Park Avenue and Arch Street. Parking is available in Wheelock Park across Park Ave.

Robin Hood Park and Forest

A 130 acre forest park with a pond In 1889 George Wheelock donated 12 acres of land to be called “The Children’s Wood”. In 1896 he added 83 acres which he named Robin Hood Forest. The forest is located on a west-facing hillside with a scenic pond at its base. The park has numerous ledges and massive boulders. A small stream cascades into the pond. A maze of trails criss-crosses the park. The facilities include a swimming pool, tennis courts, playground equipment, picnic tables, park benches and a playing field. Bathrooms are open in the summer and the pond is groomed for skating in the winter. A detailed brochure on Robin Hood Forest and the Children’s Wood is available from the City of Keene Parks and Recreation Department.  To get there: Turn left at 366 Reservoir Street off of Roxbury Street. Parking is in the lot between the pond and the swimming pool.

Ashuelot River Park

157 acre park including the Ashuelot River and adjoining wetlands The main trail along the east side of the river begins at the West Street Entrance. The pathextends north to the bike trail near the Route 9 bypass. At that point you can cross the bike path bridge and follow a much smaller trail along the west bank of the river north to the Tanglewood Estates trailer court or follow the paved bike path which continues on to Wheelock Park. The park was newly landscaped and rededicated in 1996. .  To get there: Heading away from downtown Keene on West Street, pass the Colony Mill Marketplace on your left. Turn right at the next stoplight to park at the main entrance. You can also enter the park from the bike path between Wheelock Park and Court Street. Maintained by the City of Keene Parks and Recreation Department

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